Quick Answer: Can Trigger Finger Surgery Fail?

Is hot or cold better for trigger finger?

Heat or ice: Heat or ice can be applied to reduce swelling.

Placing your hand in warm water several times throughout the day can also relax the tendons and muscles in your fingers and hand.

Exercise: Gentle exercises may help decrease stiffness and improve range of motion..

Can I get disability for trigger finger?

If your trigger finger, trigger thumb, or other finger or thumb injury occurred as the result of workplace activities, you may be entitled to workers’ comp benefits, even if you have been told that your injuries are the result of “just getting older.” Often, injuries attributed to age are actually repetitive stress …

How long is trigger finger surgery recovery?

Your doctor will take out your stitches 1 to 2 weeks after surgery. It will probably take about 6 weeks for your finger to heal completely. Once healed, your finger may move easily without pain. How soon you can return to work depends on your job.

How long does a trigger finger last?

The time it takes to get better depends on your condition. The choice of treatment also affects recovery. For example, you may need to wear a splint for 6 weeks. But most patients with trigger finger recover within a few weeks by resting the finger and using anti-inflammatory drugs.

Is trigger finger surgery painful?

Surgery may initially cause some pain or soreness. Doctors may recommend over-the-counter painkillers for relief. Immediately after surgery, a person should be able to move their finger or thumb. Be gentle with movements at first; full movement can be expected to return in 1 to 2 weeks.

What is the average cost of trigger finger surgery?

RESULTS: The overall success of the first steroid injection for trigger finger treatment was 63%, the second injection was 67%. Surgery was 100% effective. The average cost of a steroid injection was $506 and the average cost of trigger finger surgery was $5307.

Is trigger finger a sign of arthritis?

Causes. Trigger fingers are more common with certain medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout and diabetes. Repeated and strong gripping may lead to the condition. In most cases, the cause of the trigger finger is not known.

What exercise is good for trigger finger?

Finger extensor stretch Lay your hand out flat on a table or solid surface. Use your other hand to hold the affected finger. Slowly lift up the finger and keep the rest of your fingers flat. Lift and stretch the finger as high as it will go without straining.

Can trigger finger come back after surgery?

The tendon sheath that’s cut during surgery grows back together more loosely so the tendon has more room to move. Sometimes people need more than one surgery. But trigger finger only recurs in about 3 percent of people after either open surgery or percutaneous release.

When should you see a doctor for trigger finger?

If the condition has become painful and caused finger stiffness, persisted for longer than six weeks, or if the patient is diabetic, surgical treatment is usually needed.

Do you need physical therapy after trigger finger surgery?

Heavy lifting or strenuous activity should be avoided until permitted by your doctor, usually 3 weeks postoperatively. Hand therapy may be recommended for you following surgery. Follow-up: You should be seen in the office 10-14 days after surgery.

How do you fix a trigger finger without surgery?

Resting your hands if possible, wearing a splint at night, stretching exercises and a steroid injection all can alleviate trigger finger without surgery. Severity of trigger finger can be as simple as an annoying pop or sensation of the joint being stuck when you extend the finger.

Are you awake during trigger finger surgery?

This surgery will probably be done while you are awake. The doctor will give you a shot (injection) to numb your hand and prevent pain. You also may get medicine to help you relax. During the surgery, the doctor will make an incision in the skin of your finger or palm.

What is the success rate of trigger finger surgery?

Some form of this surgery has been done for about a century, and the success rate is over 90%. There are possible problems like tendon or nerve damage, infection, and scarring. And some studies show the success rate is lower in people with diabetes.

What can go wrong with trigger finger surgery?

Potential complications of TF surgery include the following: Tenderness over the site of the incision – This occurs quite frequently but usually settles on its own. Adhesions and subsequent stiffness – This may develop with excessive handling of the tendon or delayed postoperative mobilization.